What Are the European Roulette Rules?

Roulette is a well-established casino game, owing to its long history spanning two centuries and a player-base that numbers at six figures at the very least. It has been with gamblers long enough that the game has evolved and spawned several variants that cater to the tastes of its players or that of the casino’s proprietors.

One of these variants is European roulette. For many, this version of the game is the “default” variety, being often referenced when one talks about drastically different roulette games like French and American roulette. In addition, European roulette has also become the basis of many less known varieties, many of which you’ve probably only encountered in online casinos.

Basic Characteristics of European Roulette

The game set up of European roulette is almost what you can consider an archetype of roulette. It’s composed of no more than the table with an appropriately labeled layout and the wheel at the far end – not very different from that of American roulette, which to many, is the only other version of the game.

The European roulette wheel however, features only one zero just like French roulette and many other variants that came after it. This is actually the original set up of the game before many casinos way back switched to the now declining double zero roulette wheel. The presence of one zero ruins the supposed fifty-fifty winning chances of the game’s even-money bets, but at a significantly lower percentage than the alternative double zero set up does.

In addition to this, the European game is also rife with unique table practices. For one, the bets are made using standard chips with their corresponding monetary value and the dealer sweeps them off the table using a special spade instead of his or her hands. Also, a tip to the dealer is not obligatory in European roulette, whereas it is a common gesture of courtesy in any other version.

European Roulette’s Rules

European roulette rules are fundamentally the same as in any other roulette games. As usual, the game begins once the table is opened for betting. In a span of a minute, the players place their stakes on a single number or a group of which. The betting ends once the dealer announces “No more bets” and spins the wheel. The ball is then rolled and wherever it stops is the winning bet. Now the winner doesn’t have to be specifically betting on that number, but also those betting on its color or the outside bet that covers it.

European roulette rules however, have a few quirks that make them stand out from those in other variations of roulette. Most of these are the inherited from the radically different French roulette, the most significant of which are the La Partage and En Prison rules. Both are applicable to even-money bets and are invoked as options whenever zero comes up. If the player opts for La Partage, he or she loses only half of the amount that was placed as bet. Alternatively, if the player opts for En Prison, his or her intact bets remain on the table for the next spin – this loses once zero comes up again, or is fully recovered if a different bet comes up.

Superficially, European roulette has the same feel as other versions of roulette. However, the rules pretty much differ from other variants, as do certain characteristics that are only visible to those who actually play the game.

Other articles:

  1. American Roulette: Rules and a Quick Overview
  2. Taking a Closer Look at Roulette Rules
  3. How American Roulette Differs from the European Roulette

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