Category Archives: roulette rules

Taking a Closer Look at Roulette Rules

Perhaps no other game of chance has gained as much respect and following as the ever popular casino game roulette. Roulette has garnered all these throughout the more than two centuries of its existence, barely changing from generation to generation. This fame extends beyond the walls of the casino – even if you’re a non-gambler, we’re pretty sure you’ve heard of this game at least once, given its oft-repeated portrayal in popular culture, usually as the very symbol of casinos themselves.

The Roulette Wheel and Table

Roulette’s popularity depends mainly on two factors: its straightforward game set up and the relatively simple roulette rules that accompany it. A typical roulette set has a table and a wheel, the arrangement of which depends on the version being played. Now the wheel has a number of red and black pockets – 37 in European roulette (0 and 1-36) and 38 in its American counterpart (0, 00 and 1-36) – the number or color of which the player bets on. The dealer spins this wheel on one direction and throws the ball on another, traveling on a track near the rim.

Meanwhile, the table has a layout where the bets are placed. In this layout, numbers 1-36, each with its respective color, are grouped in three columns. These are surrounded by the outside bet slots – typically red, black, odd, even, 1-18, 19-36, three column bets and three dozen bets – and 0 for European roulette or 0 and 00 for the American version of the game.

The Rules of the Casino Game

Eight players more or less are allowed to participate in a single roulette table. These players each predict which number or color the ball will land on after the next spin. They then place their chips – colored differently for each player – on their guesses. While doing so, the dealer starts to spin the wheel and, upon dropping the ball, announces, “No more bets.” The winning stakes is determined by that one pocket in the wheel on which the ball falls into. The winner’s chips are then exchanged with special chips – wherein a corresponding monetary value is imprinted – to be exchanged with real cash.

Types of Roulette Bets

Now there are two types of bets: inside and outside bets. These two types are subdivided into more specific categories. For inside bets, there are the straight (single number), split (two numbers), street (three numbers), square (four numbers) and the literally named five-number bets. Outside bets meanwhile are as follows: red or black, odd or even, low bets (1-18), high bets (19-36), column bets and dozen bets. We’ll talk about these wagers in another article.

Basics of Roulette Payouts

The payouts are determined by the winning player’s bet. The lesser the chances the bet has of winning, the higher the payout. For example, bets with fifty-fifty winning chances (a. k. a. even-money outside bets, e. g. red or black) pays one to one, thus earning the same amount as the original wager, while a single non-zero number can usually net 35 to one. The house then takes one or two chips from the player’s win, a deduction called the house advantage, from which the casino profits.

Other Rules in Roulette Games

Some casinos feature the roulette rules En Prison and La Partage besides the basic game play. The En Prison rule applies to even-money outside bets. Whenever the spin results in zero, the player is allowed to take one-half of his/her bet or leave it where it is for the next spin which should not once again result in zero or the whole bet is lost. The La Partage rule also applies to the same type of bets, but this time, the player loses only half the bet when the spin hits zero, and is not allowed to leave the remaining chips for the next spin. These rules significantly cut the house advantage on even-money outside bets and are thus not common to all casinos.

As can be read from the content of this article, roulette rules are not really that hard to follow. It should also be noted that these rules are the same for all roulette versions, with minor variation between the American and European versions. Granted, one can say that even an illiterate vagrant who cannot count can play the game as it should be played, provided that the basics are explained clearly and he can differentiate between numbers of course.